Rockfish with Orange, Fennel and Cannellini Beans

Get ready for the perfect light summer dinner that tastes great and will make you feel amazing! Fish in general is a perfect choice for a light and flavorful dinner. There are so many different ways to cook rockfish, but broiling your fish is an almost effortless and easy way to get the job done...yet still be full of flavor.  

Rockfish has a mild flavor with a flaky medium-firm texture. Not only is the fish on the sweeter side, but the fillets are packed with iron and vitamin B-12. Rockfish also provides a decent amount of omega-3 fatty acids, which our bodies cannot produce on their own. Did you know that omega-3s are thought to contribute to brain function and may reduce the levels of harmful inflammation in your body? That’s why the American Heart Association recommends eating two 3.5 oz servings of fatty fish each week!

Rockfish and oranges compliment each other quite nicely as the the fish already adds its own subtle sweetness. Cara Cara oranges and their unique red-tint bring a vibrant color pop to this dish. They also add an extra Vitamin C and A boost. Absorbing all of the flavor, the sliced fennel brings the ingredients together and the thyme intensifies these flavors even more.  

While you may have not tried Rockfish before, it is delicious! Give it a whirl and prepare to be dazzled.  


Rockfish with Oranges, Fennel, and Cannellini Beans

Time: 45 Minutes
Serves 4
 
Ingredients
Extra-virgin olive oil, divided
1 small red onion, thinly sliced
1 tbsp fresh thyme, finely chopped + additional thyme leaves to garnish
Kosher salt and freshly cracked black pepper
¼ cup mirin

2 (15 oz) cans cannellini beans, rinsed and drained
4 garlic cloves, finely chopped
¾ cup chicken broth
1 medium cara cara orange: ½ thinly sliced, juice and zest of ½ orange
1 cup fennel bulb, thinly sliced, divided
4 (6 oz) rockfish fillets
1 medium navel orange, thinly sliced
1 large fennel frond (optional)

Directions
Set an oven rack in the top third of the oven and preheat broiler.
 
In a large skillet or Dutch oven, heat 3 tbsp olive oil over medium heat. Add red onion and stir until soft, about 4-5 minutes. Stir in 1 tbsp thyme and season with salt and pepper to taste. Add mirin and continue stirring until reduced, about 3-4 minutes. Add the cannellini beans, garlic, and chicken stock and stir until well combined, about 2 minutes. Add the cara cara orange zest, half the sliced fennel, and cook over medium-high heat until the fennel is soft, about 5 minutes. Remove from heat and keep warm.
 
Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Lightly coat fish on all sides with olive oil and season with salt and pepper to taste. In a small bowl, add half of the fennel and 2 tsp olive oil. Season with salt and pepper and mix to combine. Top the fish with the remaining sliced fennel, cara cara and navel orange slices, and a large fennel frond. Squeeze cara cara orange juice over the fish and vegetables.
 
Broil the fish for about 10-12 minutes until the internal temperature reaches 145F. Remove from heat.
 
Serve the beans on plates and top with the rock fish and orange slices. Garnish with thyme leaves if desired.


Comment


Print

Not-So-Basic Sweet Potato Hash

I’m excited to collaborate with Alite Designs' Outside 101 on recipes that are perfect for this summer’s camping season.

To showcase one of the many ways I like to make my camp breakfast anything less than basic, but easy at the same time, I brought my ‘Not-So-Basic Sweet Potato Breakfast Hash’ to life. If there’s one thing I can tell people about eating a well-balanced breakfast, it’s to make it easy, but more importantly enjoyable! You won’t be enticed to eat something if it feels like a chore.

 Can you tell that my #1 tip for spicing up breakfast is to be bold and to add color?

I consistently have more of a savory palate, but every now and then I crave something sweet. This is my “sweet” take on the classic breakfast potato hash. It features spicy Indonesian flavors and is a unique and delicious way to start your day.  

When cooking at camp, I love adding some cultural flare, just as I do in my kitchen. So I found some Indonesian inspiration by using sambal bajak. Sambal bajak is basically an Indonesian condiment. It’s made with chilies and salt and is accompanied by spices like palm sugar, lemongrass and tamarind, then blended together in hot oil.  Can you say YUM?!

If sambal bajak isn’t available to you, you can also use sambal oelek or sriracha. Basically any fiery chili sauce will do, but sambal bajak does round out the hash's flavors the most! Hint: You can easily find the spice paste on Amazon.

Another way to make camp breakfast easier is to do your homework! We all learned growing up that coming to class prepared sets you up for success, right? This can absolutely be applied to your camp cooking as well.

Buying your veggies pre-cut saves so much time and takes the prep right out of the equation. Sometimes buying pre-cut veggies can be expensive, so another alternative is to chop and slice them before your trip and then pack them in your cooler, ready-to-go.  You’ll for sure be set up for success in your camp kitchen!

The variety of veggies in this dish are packed with vitamins and minerals that taste good and are even better for you! This is why sweet potatoes and kale are two of my favorite ‘superfoods.

Sweet potatoes, one of the most nutrient dense foods on the planet, are filled with antioxidants that promote anti-inflammation while kale is filled with vitamin B, which is key for brain development.  The sausage and eggs add the protein as well as a healthy fat boost, which will keep you full and energized.

Long story short, these ingredients compliment each other so well and will make a colorful and hearty meal that is guaranteed to leave you satisfied.

Pro tip: don’t overcrowd the pan when cooking, or the potatoes and sausage won’t brown evenly.  Either use a large skillet or pan to cook them in a separate batches!

Not-So-Basic Sweet Potato Hash

In Collaboration with an Alite Designs recipe for Sweet Potato Hash

Time: 35 Minutes
Serves 4

Ingredients
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
1 lb sweet potato, peeled and cut into ¼-inch cubes
Extra virgin olive oil
1 chicken apple sausage link, cut into ¼ inch pieces
3 cloves garlic, minced
1 large shallot, sliced
1 small jalapeno pepper, diced
1 small green bell pepper, cut into ½-inch dice
1 small red bell pepper, cut into ½-inch dice
1 cup kale leaves, ribs removed, chopped
1 tbsp chopped thyme
1 tbsp sambal bajak or oelek
1 tbsp paprika
4 eggs

Directions
Bring a large saucepan of lightly salted water to a boil over high heat. Add potatoes and cook until just tender, about 5 minutes. Drain. Heat 2 tbsp olive oil in an extra large skillet over medium heat.

Add sausage and sweet potatoes in an even layer, and cook on one side until they begin to brown, about 5 minutes.

Season with ½ tsp kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper. Cook in batches, adding additional olive oil, to avoid overcrowding if necessary.

Stir in garlic and sauté until fragrant, about 30 seconds.

Add shallots, jalapeños, bell peppers, kale, and thyme, and cook, stirring occasionally, until the potatoes and sausage are browned on all sides, about 10 more minutes.

Season hash with salt and pepper to taste. Stir in sambal bajak and paprika and cook for about 2 minutes, until well combined. Remove from heat and keep warm.

Add enough olive oil to coat the bottom of a large frying pan and heat oil over medium-low heat. Crack about 4 eggs into the pan at a time, spooning oil over the whites. Fry until the whites are firm, but the yolks are still runny.

Serve hash on plates and garnish with a fried egg!

Enjoy your ‘Not-So-Basic Breakfast Hash’ :)


Comment


Print

Slow-Cooked Adzuki Beans with Indian Spices, Rajmah-Style

Slow-Cooked Adzuki Beans with Indian Spices, a.k.a Rajmah! This is such a delicious vegan dish and the prep is super easy. While some say beans are a magical fruit, I tend to think they’re magical for many other reasons, from their antioxidant properties to being rich in several vitamins and minerals, like folate, potassium, and iron. The complex carbs, high fiber, and protein content also help to keep me feeling full throughout my day. Plus slow-cooker recipes are the easiest ever, right? 

I was in need of a good slow cooker dish to begin in the morning and free me up to hang out with friends last night, so I scoured my pantry for legumes that I tend to buy on a whim and found a bag of adzuki beans. Knowing that Indian food is AMAZING in the slow-cooker, I did a little googling of traditional Indian recipes with red beans and put together this delicious one. I garnished with some sour cream, lime, and tomato, which isn’t very traditional, and served it with naan, instead of rice, because I felt like it is even better with a little crunch! 

Slow-Cooked Adzuki Beans with Indian Spices, Rajmah-Style

Prep Time: 20 Minutes
Total Time: 8 Hours & 20 Minutes
Serves 8

Ingredients
3 cups dried red adzuki beans or kidney beans, rinsed and sorted
1 medium yellow onion, chopped
1 tbsp ginger, minced
2  tbsp garlic, chopped
6-8 serrano chilis, chopped (less for mild)
1/4 cup tomato paste
2 tbsp cumin seeds
2 tbsp Kosher salt
2 tsp turmeric powder
2 tsp cayenne powder
1 tsp garam masala
1 tsp dried coriander
1 pinch asafoetida (hing) - optional
1 tsp kasuri methi leaves, crushed (optional)
4 tbsp olive oil
10 cups water

To Garnish
1 roma tomato, chopped
8 tbsp sour cream
1 large lime, cut into 8 wedges
4 tbsp fresh cilantro
4 pieces of naan

Directions
Bring a medium pot of salted water to a boil. Add adzuki beans and boil for 10 minutes. Drain and add to slow cooker. Add remaining ingredients (except for those to garnish) to the slow cooker and cook on low for 8 hours.

Ladle beans into bowls and garnish with tomato, sour cream, a squeeze of lime, and cilantro. Serve immediately with naan. 

Nutritional Info per serving (excluding naan): 375 Calories, 11g fat, 57g Carbs, 11g Fiber, 17g protein  

Comment


Print

Roasted Pork Tenderloin Salad with Braised Fennel and Radicchio

I’ve been making the most delicious fennel-rubbed pork tenderloin thanks to Ian Knauer for several years now. I usually serve it over a lemony orzo risotto, but this time I decided to adapt the recipe into a salad when I had a little radicchio on hand from an impulse buy at the grocery store. 

Okay, so it wasn’t really an impulse buy. While I didn’t know exactly what I would do with the radicchio when I bought it, I knew something would come to me.  And that it did! Amazingly, our annual fennel plant we planted last year rebounded, and produced several more delicious bulbs this year. We also had some pomegranates sitting in the fridge from a friend’s tree. It made perfect sense that these sweet flavors would make a delicious pairing with the bitter radicchio, and could also be a good lesson in food history for all of you.

Believe it or not, I actually love radicchio for its bitter flavors. Full disclosure: I had my DNA analyzed a couple years ago and my genes did give me away as a person who likes bitter foods, which explains why I like black coffee and IPA! But you know what? People who like bitter foods tend to be healthier overall. This is because there are more phytonutrients in bitter produce than mild produce, which is due to the fact that modern agriculture bred these phytonutrients out in favor of sweeter produce with even less fiber. 

So what does this mean for us in the modern era? It means that it’s beneficial to test our palate, and even if we don’t like the flavors the first or second time, we can become accustomed to them, or even pair them with other ingredients to balance the flavors. So the next time you bite into a bitter vegetable, like radicchio or arugula, instead of turning up your nose, maybe think how you can make it yummy! Pro tip: Look for vegetables rich in deep colors like purple, green, red, orange, and blue. These pigments are full of antioxidants that can fight cancer and prevent heart disease. For more reading on this, check out this interesting article in the New York Times.

Below is the recipe. I hope you make it and enjoy it! It’s not too bitter in the end. I promise.

Roasted Pork Tenderloin Salad with Braised Fennel and Radicchio

Adapted from Ian Knauer
Time: 45 Minutes
Serves 4

Ingredients

Pork Tenderloin
1 tsp fennel seeds
Kosher Salt
Pepper
1 lb pork tenderloin
2 medium fennel bulbs, trimmed, cut into 1/2 inch wedges (reserve 1/4 cup fronds)
2 tbsp olive oil
5 garlic cloves
1/4 cup dry white wine
1/2 cup chicen broth
2 tbsp butter, cut into pieces
1 tbsp lemon juice

Radicchio Salad
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
3 tbsp red-wine vinegar
1 small shallot, minced
2 tsp whole-grain Dijon mustard
Kosher salt
Freshly ground pepper
1 small head radicchio, trimmed, leaves torn
1 small bunch chives, cut into 2-inch lengths
Seeds from 1 small pomegranate
1/2 cup parmesan cheese, grated

Directions
Preheat oven to 350F with rack in the middle.

In a small skillet, toast fennel seeds over medium heat, bout 2-3 minutes, until fragrant and lightly browned. Let cool. Roughly grind seeds in a spice grinder or with a mortar and pestle.

Pat pork dry, then sprinkle with crushed fennel seeds and 1/2 teaspoon each of salt and pepper. 

Heat oil in a 12-inch oven-proof heavy skillet over medium-high heat until it shimmers. Brown pork on all sides, about 6 minutes total, then transfer to a plate. Sauté garlic and fennel wedges in skillet until fennel is golden brown, about 6 minutes. Add wine, stirring and scraping up brown bits, then stir in broth and butter. Nestle pork top of fennel and transfer skillet to oven. Roast until an instant-read thermometer inserted into center of pork registers 145 to 150°F, about 15 minutes. Transfer pork to a cutting board and let rest 10 minutes.

Meanwhile, transfer skillet to stovetop (handle will be hot) and boil, stirring occasionally, until most of liquid has evaporated. Stir in lemon juice and reserved fennel fronds. Remove from heat.

In a large serving bowl, prepare dressing by whisking olive oil, vinegar, shallot, mustard, and seasoning with salt and pepper. Add 2 tbsp of the braising liquid from the skillet and torn radicchio. Toss to combine and let sit 5 minutes to soften. Add braised fennel wedges, chives, pomegranate seeds, and toss again to combine. 

Thinly slice pork and serve over radicchio salad. Garnish with parmesan cheese and enjoy!

Comment


Print

Chicken in Spicy Lemongrass Sauce (Ayam Sambal Goreng Sereh)

This recipe for Indonesian-style lemongrass chicken is deliciously outstanding, as lemongrass chicken always is! And the lemongrass was grown in our garden to boot! 

The greatest thing about this lemongrass chicken is how many anti-inflammatory ingredients are included. I was just talking with my mom this morning about how food is medicine and this dish is a shining example of that. Between the lemongrass, ginger, garlic, galangal, and turmeric, this is a meal that is sure to please your belly and keep your body healthy and happy. 

To keep this dish on anti-inflammatory end, I served it up with a rice alternative that is made out of konnyaku flour and oat flour. Definitely not a bad substitute for white rice, I must say! Plus the calories were reduced by half, which means more chicken for me, yay!

If you’d like to learn more about Indonesian cuisine, check out this guide from Bookmundi about local must-try foods. It’s known to make tummies rumble!

Chicken in Spicy Lemongrass Sauce (Ayam Sambal Goreng Sereh)

Adapted from Daily Cooking Quest
Time: 1 Hour
Serves 4

Ingredients
4 skin-on, bone-in chicken thighs
1 tsp salt
½ tsp turmeric powder
10 birdseye chilies, or more to taste
3 shallots
3 cloves garlic
2 lemongrass stalks, white part only
2-inch piece galangal
1 teaspoon turmeric powder
3 tbsp olive oil
2 lemongrass stalks, bruised and knotted
1 cup light coconut milk
½ tbsp tamarind + 4 tbsp hot water, mixed well, strained
2 tbsp sugar
Kosher salt, to taste
Steamed coconut rice, to serve

Directions
In a large bowl, marinate chicken with salt and turmeric for 15 minutes. 

Meanwhile, prepare spice paste by adding chilies, shallots, garlic, 2 lemongrass stalks (white pieces only), galangal, and turmeric to a food processor. Blend until the paste reaches a smooth consistency.

Heat oil in a large skillet or Dutch oven on medium-high heat. Fry chicken until the skin is crispy and golden brown, about 5-6 minutes on each side. Transfer chicken to a plate and keep warm.

In the same skillet, add spice paste and lemongrass, and fry until fragrant, about 3 to 5 minutes. Add coconut milk, tamarind paste, sugar, and salt to the frying pan. Bring to a boil and then reduce heat to a simmer. Return the chicken into the pan and cook until the sauce is reduced and the chicken is fully cooked. Serve over steamed coconut rice. 

Comment


Print